Stille Lyd – Part II on Canadian Radio, CKUC 93.1 FM

Stille Lyd – Part II was selected as part of the ‘Acoustic Frontiers’ playlist for September, broadcast on CKCU-FM () 93.1, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

This is a fantastic programme featuring the latest electroacoustic sounds from around the world. It’s really great to have been selected for the playlist and to be able to share the work from this project with listeners of CKUC.

The programme featuring my works is available ON DEMAND here.

Concert Two – Greenwich, London. 6th January 2015

In January 2015 I hosted another iteration of the project concert, this time in Greenwich.

Click the image below for a copy of the concert programme:
GRE concert Flyer

I recently started work at the University of Greenwich and as an introduction to my work and a statement of intention (we are launching Sound as a significant academic / research area here) the ‘Stille Lyd’ concert would be perfect.

The Concert

Jøran Rudi and Magnus Bugge flew across for the event and to present their works (as well as to present to students on their own work).

We had a great turn out, filling the “Crit Pit” of our building in Stockwell Street.


The Drinks Reception

The concert was followed by an excellent drinks reception which gave everyone the chance to meet and discuss, and also to enjoy the Brunøst which Magnus had kindly brought over with him!

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Special thanks to everyone who came, to Jøran and Magnus and to students and colleagues at the University of Greenwich who have supported the Sound area to make this concert possible.

Stille Lyd: A concert of electroacoustic works from Norway.

Friday 28th March will mark the formal end of this project with a final concert event presenting the works that I have developed, alongside those of my friends at NOTAM and a piece by Arne Nordheim.


I’ll be giving a short talk about the project and cracking open some cheese and wine, so it’d be great to see you if you are anywhere nearby.

The event is free and takes place in Leicester, at the PACE building, Richmond Street, LE1 9BH

Composition Titles

I also decided that it was more appropriate that my pieces had Norwegian titles. Not only does it look and sound cooler, but it instantly links the work with the project and its place of inspiration and creation.

My ‘Norsk’ Form

Following my reflections on the first piece (though kind comments and feedback indicate that I was, perhaps, over critical) I have endeavoured to further develop and fully elaborate on each section of the work, so as to fully realise an effective structural form.

Half way through this process I realised that the form of this second piece is rather similar to the first piece. With a slow building open and close form, and an exploration of dry montaged materials in the middle section (this is perhaps also similar to the structure of my audio-visual piece Perpetual Motion). Such similarity gave me cause for concern, especially since I was troubled about the structure of the first piece.

Exactly as with the Mouse squeaks in the first piece, the second work made a quick transition from pitched ambient drones and granular clouds above to dry gestural material. I must find a solution to this predicament and perhaps further elaboration of this middle section is all that is required?


The sound materials themselves are wonderful. The close recordings of the creaking and crunching of snow need very little processing, and would be spoiled by too much interference. But they must sit cohesively with the other sections of the work.

Perhaps I am to attached to these dry sounds?

Perhaps I should let go of their purity and clarity and introduce some subtle processing?

But I am scared to do too much. If Abstracted Journeys has taught me anything, it is that subtly montage and edited sound prove to be a successful tonic to the vast array of processed materials around.

Perhaps I should just live with my ‘Norsk’ form?

“Quiet” Composition Two

Getting off the Ground

The development of this piece has taken longer than initially anticipated but is finally being realised. This delay is partly due to the extension of the initial piece from a miniature into a more extended work. Indeed, that work (“Quiet”- Part One) could still be expanded upon and developed and I shall perhaps have to go back to NOTAM in order to realise it properly.

But, with the closing date of this project edging ever closer, and despite a multitude of potential compositional concepts, I struggled to actually get on and develop anything for the second work that I was happy with.

While in Oslo I’d read an article about procrastination:

Why are writers such exceptional procrastinators? They fear being confronted with a simple truth: They’re not as good as they think they are…

Perhaps it was fear. But it also might have been that the sound materials which I collected had not been as I initially imagined.

A combination of the weather conditions and a creaky Rycote (apparently a recognised issue when recording at low temperatures) meant that I had very few extended and uninterrupted recordings. Initially I had panned to layer and mix between extended recordings of the mountain soundscape with subtle filtering and little technological intervention, but the reality of the recordings made this impossible.

Therefore, I was holding onto a creative concept that could not be realised in the way I had initially intended / hoped.

Forging a Piece

SO, I finally locked myself in my studio for a whole day and began to transform some of the sounds that I had recorded. One that was especially nice (and which I was happy with) was the recording of the frozen river.

Dushume had also encouraged me to work with this sound, and so I took the file extracted the loudest bins and applied the impulse response of the Vigeland mausoleum to create a rich mixture of bubbling pitches.

But this sound was far too active. So I loaded it into CDP (version 7 free to download) and used the time stretch functions, both the ‘analogue’ speed/transposition tool and the FFT time stretch. By drawing these out I created rich pitched and evolving textures with organic morphologies (that is my interpretation).

These will form the foundation for my piece, with their morphologies being articulated with more granular and crunchy textures such as the falling snow striking our ski jackets and the stepping or skiing through snow. I shall also seek to use any ambiences where possible.

Here is a very rough sketch of the introduction to the new piece:

Other options

The kind folk at NOTAM give me their ‘Vinterlyder’ library of winter recordings, and I may dig into these to find some ambiences but I would like if possible to use my own recordings.

Trip Three: Recording Part Four

For the final full day of my time in Norway I headed to the centre of town and the waterfront.

It is in this area that the river Akerselva meets the Oslofjord, finally completing its journey weaving down through the centre of the city. The river actually disappears underground at this point, entirely consumed by the city.

Screen shot 2014-02-22 at 21.08.11

This area along the waterfront is home to extensive redevelopment. I walked around on the roof of the Opera house and captured some excellent construction sounds as these large diggers forced metal pylons into the ground. With the direct sound and the reflections off of the surfaces of the opera house and other nearby buildings it presented a very appealing soundscape.

Following this I walked back up towards the palace and my hotel. En route I was able to capture a rich and complex soundscape along Karl Johans gate.

After this I walked back to the hotel, grabbed my laptop and headed across to the studios for my last session booked in studio Nordheim.